British Scones: Raisin and Chocolate

British Scones - Raisin

 

British Scones - Chocolate

Our test kitchen has made yet another attempt at creating a new type of gluten free scone. Scones, which are so popular throughout the United Kingdom, have enjoyed an ever increasing popularity in many parts of the world. This has not been lost on those of us requiring a gluten free diet. It presents  somewhat of a problem, if one does not wish to use an excess amount of starch in the recipe. We are still in the process of perfecting two new scone recipes we are currently working on. So far, we are happy with the taste and easy workability of the recipes, but would like to perfect and recreate the general softness of the traditional scones. One that can be sliced easily, but that does not require the use of potato starch. Continue reading

Buttermilk and Scottish “tattie” Potato Scones

 

Buttermilk Scones, copyright 2015, gfcelebration.com, All rights reserved

Baking scones has become a tradition in our family, resulting, after much tinkering, in quite a few different gluten free versions. We experimented with some very traditional recipes for buttermilk, or raisin scones, along the way developing some of our own more creative varieties, such as pumpkin, lemon, and chai scones. You can find several versions in our book “A Celebration of Gluten Free Baking,” and others here on our website.

Having several family members from Europe, favorite items like scones become an easy standby in the recipe repertoire, served for dessert with coffee, or tea, or served as part of breakfast. However, we never knew much about the history of scones. Where did the idea originally come from? Who started it? Why? Continue reading

Scottish Scones with Chestnut Flour

Scottish Scones with Chestnut Flour

Today we wanted to share a little information about the history, nutrition and other interesting facts about chestnut trees, prior to giving you our latest recipe using this exquisite and delicate flour.

There are many different species of the chestnut tree. The trees that most of our current edible chestnuts come from are the Sweet Chestnut, or Castanea sativa, a European variety, as well as the American Chestnut, Castanea dentata, the most familiar American species. Continue reading